Type of issue: relationship with lawyers

6 05, 2019

Ask the insurance company

2019-08-30T16:30:43+08:00May 6th, 2019|Articles, Stories|

Most injured workers who seek help from TWC2 have engaged a law firm to assist with their injury claim.  Although legal assistance is not necessary for the no-fault work injury compensation (WIC) process at the Ministry of Manpower (MOM), many workers feel more secure having an injury lawyer.  Perhaps the worker is unsure

16 02, 2019

Are foreign workers abusing WIC claims?

2019-08-30T16:30:45+08:00February 16th, 2019|Articles, Facts, research, analysis|

By Debbie Fordyce The first graph (below) suggests that a disproportionate number of Indian and Bangladeshi migrant workers lodge injury claims within the first six months of starting a job. Moreover, TWC2's observation is that many of these injuries are minor and result in little compensation or will heal completely, thus meriting no disability compensation

29 11, 2018

Does MOM pay work injury lawyers?

2019-08-30T16:30:46+08:00November 29th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Debbie Fordyce Does the Ministry of Manpower pay lawyers to handle work injury compensation claims? “Lawyers always exciting to take case.” At least some injured workers certainly think that MOM does. They say that they’ve heard that MOM pays lawyers $300 a month to file and manage work injury compensation (WIC) claims. Newly injured

5 08, 2018

Unreported work injuries: more than a matter of statistics

2019-08-30T16:31:03+08:00August 5th, 2018|Articles, News, Our Stand, Stories|

By Liang Lei, based on interviews in June 2018 It is common knowledge that timely diagnosis and treatment of injuries go a long way in minimizing pain and speeding up recovery. In Singapore, the Work Injury Compensation Act  (WICA) seeks to enable that, by allowing employees injured at work to file claims for, amongst other

25 07, 2018

False hope, hesitant trust and bureaucratic complexities

2019-08-30T16:31:03+08:00July 25th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Liang Lei, based on an interview in May 2018 Received unexpectedly dismal scores for an assessment? Appeal. Although this “survival tactic” for examinations seems to transcend cultures, the consequences can vary drastically from one situation to another. In the case of a foreign worker’s Permanent Incapacity Compensation score, a hasty decision to appeal may

26 06, 2018

Mithun’s first 20 minutes with TWC2

2019-08-30T16:31:04+08:00June 26th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Zhan Nanxin, from an evening in March 2018 Like many other first timers, Sheikh Mohammad Mithun comes to Transient Workers Count Too's Dayspace in Little India unsure of what to expect, hoping for advice and help. What catches our eye is the large bag of medication in his left hand. That's quite unusual. He

2 04, 2018

Exploitative law firms: systemic solutions needed from MOM

2019-08-30T16:31:06+08:00April 2nd, 2018|News, Our Stand|

In late March 2018, a short while after this article Two injured workers provide detailed accounts of a law firm's practices was published, the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) asked for the names of the workers and law firms involved. Transient Workers Count Too declined to provide this information. As the details of that story indicated, the

26 03, 2018

Confidence-destroying interactions with doctors leave Shamim with little trust in compensation system

2019-08-30T16:31:06+08:00March 26th, 2018|Articles, Stories|

By Alston Ng, based on an interview in January 2018 In the midst of casual conversations with some usual faces at Alankar Restaurant, Hossen Mohammed Shamim, a 29-year-old Bangladeshi who has not worked for about a year and a half, interjects, “You want interview? Come, I give you interview, you help me.” Evidently not one